Bright

[3 stars]

Imagine Alien Nation reconceived with orcs and fairies instead of extraterrestrials. More importantly, imagine that world as if it had been the status quo for thousands of years instead of only a decade or so. It is an intriguing concept, especially with the rise of fantasy into the mainstream.

This is the world that writer Max Landis attempts to lay out for us. Frustratingly, he is an unpredictable writer. He can hit the mark with movies like American Ultra as well as miss the target widely with fare like Victor Frankenstein.  Bright is a script that lands in the middle of those two. Unlike Alien Nation, he loses the family dynamic for buddy cops Will Smith (Collateral Beauty) and Joel Edgerton (It Comes at Night), which is essential to bridging their understanding of one another. Truthfully, neither of their characters is fleshed out in any real, believable way. There are odd gaps in understanding and culture as well a demonstrated well of intelligence and capability in a world they have supposedly grown up in.

It comes down to a matter of genre. Landis didn’t quite know how to show us this new world so we could understand it. He  also really didn’t understand how to tweak history, which would have radically changed where we are today, not just a few little things, to create a fleshed out, new LA. And the ending is so telegraphed it is actually almost a disappointment when it finally arrives.

I do wonder if some of the lack of depth is due to director David Ayer’s (Suicide Squad) choices or decisions. Ayer has played on both sides of the camera in the cop milieu. He wrote Training Day and directed End of Watch, both critical darlings. Both were also quite dark and violent, which is where this movie shines in fight (after fight after fight) with different players all trying to wrest the prize from Smith and Edgerton. The fights get quite inventive and fun, but they’d have meant more if we had more invested in the world and characters.

One of the sets of anti-players is led by a very spooky Noomi Rapace (Unlocked). She doesn’t get to act much in this movie, but she gets some great tableaus and costumes. She is helped along by two credible fighters in Veronica Ngo and Alex Meraz. Another incomplete pairing, from the law enforcement (dark)side, is Ike Barinholtz (Mindy Project) and Happy Anderson (The Knick) who serve for exposition and additional tension, though not a lot of believability.

So, how much confidence does Netflix have in this movie: They’ve ordered a sequel on the day of release. There is a LOT of potential here, but they need to get someone with more genre experience, like Rockne S. O’Bannon or one of the Whedon clan to come in and fill out the world and characters to make them more compelling.  It feels more like a prologue than a complete story due to the lack of world and character depth. We want and expect more, but will apparently have to wait for it.

This is still a fun ride, and worth a couple hours on the couch with some popcorn, but given the depth of talent in the main roles, you’d like to see it used rather than just as names on a marquis.

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