In the Flesh (Series 2)

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I don’t know why society is so zombie obsessed these past few years, though I’ve mused on that, but it has meant that there is a wealth of material to choose from beyond the Night of the Living Dead and Resident Evil fare. Some are great (Les Revenants), some, in my opinion, not as much(The Walking Dead).

The first series of this show was one of the better ones. Though more metaphor than thriller, and a bit too short, it definitely caught my attention. This second series builds on the world that had been created to support the previous story, but loses a little of depth that the first series mustered. It also had a slow and jarring start to the new storyline as a lot of the character of the show evolved between series. That said, the 6 episode arc attempts to answer some open questions of the first series, while raising more, and tackling more than a few aspects of humanity.

Newberry (Quartet) takes Kieren through another looping path of emotions and life.  And Bevan (St. Trinian’s) gets to expand on her character in some rather unexpected ways. Cains (In the Flesh) likewise gets to explore a bit more of the person she’s created; I’d love to see her in another role to better gauge her abilities. Coming into the story, Mosaku (Dancing on the Edge, Womb) isn’t well served by the script, but does what she can to make her presence believable. And Scanlan (Hollyoaks) provides some good presence but not quite enough focused action.

Regardless of any lacks, the series pulled me in and pulled me along. It will cause you to think, which I realize isn’t the reason most folks tune into zombie shows, but it definitely enriches the experience for me. And, again, they’ve left enough for a third series… in fact, they opened up a few new lines of inquiry that they darn well better answer. The world of In the Flesh continues to expand and become more intriguing. Given the short series, I’d like to see the writing improve, particularly for the “bad guys” who come off less than believable than our “heroes.”

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