I Think We’re Alone Now

[3 stars]

Peter Dinklage (The Angriest Man in Brooklyn) and Elle Fanning (How to Talk to Girls at Parties) may not be your first thought as a pairing, but the two balance each other nicely with neither’s presence taking over the screen at the cost of the other.  And, as unlikely as they are, they make a credible couple…given the circumstances. And, yes, circumstances matter. These two are the latest to tackle what is becoming a renewed trend: quiet apocalypse films.

Director Reed Morano (Handmaid’s Tale) takes her time laying out the tone and emotional landscape of these survivors. Like Into the Forest, These Final Hours, Z for Zachariah, even 10 Cloverfield Lane and A Quiet Place, to a degree, the end of the world is a backdrop to an emotional drama rather than the point of the story. The movie also manages marry current sensibilities with two classics from The Twilight Zone: Burgess Meredith’s turn in Time Enough at Last and Elizabeth Montgomery/Charles Bronson’s Two. And if you haven’t seen these two, find time to do so.

Charlotte Gainsbourg (The Snowman) and Paul Giamatti (Morgan) round out the small cast and add some necessary layers. Neither is particularly brilliant in their roles, but they are intended to feel out of place.

By the end, it is clear the film is as much metaphor as it is its own story. In fact, it has several messages, some highly personal and human and some social commentary (particularly in the final moments). It is to Marano’s credit that she delivers a kaleidoscope that allows you resolve those aspects that reflect on your own mood and place in life.

As always, watching Dinklage perform is a pleasure. Fanning delivers as well, adding another positive result in an opus that is less consistent for me. This isn’t a fast or even overly intense story, but it is highly human and very effective.

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