This is the Wolverine you’ve been waiting for. This is the Logan we deserved. Definitely the best of the stand-alone Wolverine movies, and very nearly the top of the X-Men series as a whole (absent Deadpool, which is a class unto itself). It is also a great completion to Logan’s cycle and saga; it is told with heart, humor, action, and even with a bit of real honest-to-god literacy. There are psychological levels to this story that are subtle but very much thought through.

Logan, the character, has always brought a darker edge to the candy-ass PG universe we’ve certainly enjoyed, but was always “lite,” if you will. Logan, the film, is everything you’d expect from this particular storyline, full of pathos and bathos, and a tad of dark humor along with its emotional impact and carnage. And the more adult rating allows it all to feel just that much more real.

Hugh Jackman (Eddie the Eagle) will be able to proudly wear the mantle of this character through the rest of his career without cringing. And Patrick Stewart (Ted) brings out aspects of a 90+ year old Xavier that are great. Completing the main cast, Dafne Keen, in her first major role, kicks some serious butt and shows incredible range for a young actor. 

Director/co-writer James Mangold wasn’t an obvious choice to run this final outing. With the Kate & Leopold script behind him and Knight and Day as director there isn’t a direct line to this kind of production, despite having directed The Wolverine. (His fellow writers Frank and, particularly, Green had more on point, but still not expected matches.) But, without question, he pulled this off well. What we get to experience is something more akin to The Professional or Gloria than the typical tale from this universe. There are high stakes and big evil plans and mutant powers, sure, but they are the window dressing for the plot and I mean that in a good way. There is substance on screen, not just pretty lights and pictures.

If you’ve never cared about Wolverine, this probably isn’t the place to start as so much of it depends on Logan’s baggage. But if you ever liked him, you really can’t miss it on the big screen. It is worth every minute in the seat and Mangold gave it all room to develop and breathe.

[If you want a long, detailed, and spoiler-rich discussion of the source material, “Old Man Logan,” there is a good one over at Vulture. There is also a nice overview of the character’s movies and impact over at Fandor.]


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