Tag Archives: Comedy

Ted Lasso

[4 stars]

I can’t believe I’m endorsing this show (it was inspired by an ad campaign, for cryin’ out loud), but I am. I never thought it would be something I could watch; Jason Sudeikis (Colossal), just isn’t my usual cup of tea.

But that’s thing about Ted Lasso, while Sudeikis and Brendan Hunt are earnest and interesting and really sell their characters, it isn’t their show. The story is really about all the people around them, and those actors play it genuinely and beautifully. Hannah Waddingham (Sex Education), Juno Temple (Wonder Wheel), Brett Goldstein (Uncle), Jeremy Swift (Stonewall), and Nick Mohammed (The Martian) bring a host of different stories and reactions to keep you hooked. In fact, the humor is often fall-off-the-couch funny, and the honest moments are, well sometimes the same, but just as often incredibly affecting.

Frankly, I’m not a sports guy. Prior to this, the only series that ever managed to overcome my aversion to sports stories was Sports Night. But Lasso managed some of the same magic…making the story about everything other than the sport involved and getting me to care.

Lasso is already renewed for two more seasons, it’s worth your time and it’s the perfect antidote for the dark and stressful times around us. I just hope they can keep up the story and the writing.

Ted Lasso Poster

Chef’s Special (Fuera de Carta)

[2.5 stars]

Just how broad do you like your comedy? If you’re planning to come here for a feast, be prepared for something more Chuck E. Cheese than Four Seasons.

If you know me, you know that restaurant movies tend to get my attention. I love the environment and, particularly, watching the food being conceived and prepared. When provided enough of that  I’ll even, usually, give the action and story that surround it a bit of a break.

Sadly, director Nacho G. Velilla (No Manches Frida) couldn’t decide if he was going to give us a farce or a force for change in this tale from the other side of the passthrough. In the end, it’s just an unpalatable melange that barely held my attention and interest. The acting was only a notch above telenovela in its shrill delivery, though the messages and the intended heart were much more human, and the story was an oversimplified mess.

Unfortunately, in the end, this movie is a meal that leaves you wanting. It has neither a believable tale, nor does it give us enough about the food to keep the audience sated. Frankly, if it had been about 25 minutes shorter, I’d be less critical. In its lack of focus, there are a number of storylines and setups for emotional payoffs that just aren’t worth the effort. Coming in at close to 2 hours, the movie just can’t sustain.

Now, if you like broad, silly comedy that occasionally touches down in reality and that has a sort of positive message, this may be for you. It really wasn’t for me.

Chef's Special Poster

Sonic the Hedgehog

[3 stars]

Thanks to the pandemic, it’s taken ages to get my hands on a copy of this silly romp. Frankly, it was better than I expected; though far from a good film, it was entertaining for its intended audience.

And the intended audience is young. Fortunately, the cast truly committed to the story and, in context, it works just enough to let an adult get through it with a knowing smile. It doesn’t have the edge of Pokemon: Detective Pickachu, but it’s self-conscious enough that you don’t have to groan through it all.

James Marsden (The Female Brain) and Jim Carrey (Kick-Ass 2) really carry the story, though Ben Schwartz’s (Standing Up, Falling Down) Sonic knits it together nicely. Marsden actually outshines them both thanks to his guileless delivery and charisma. Despite the likes of Tika Sumpter (Old Man & the Gun) in the cast, women are notably absent in driving roles.

This is director Jeff Fowler’s first real foray directing. But when you realize he’s working with writing team Pat Casey and Josh Miller, best known for such tightly written gems like Transylmania and Golan, the Insatiable, you gotta cut the guy a break on what he could accomplish.

Basically, this is safe for kids and not boring for adults. It isn’t a great film, but it is a reasonable translation to screen for a game…but that isn’t too high a bar, is it?

Sonic the Hedgehog Poster

Military Wives

[3 stars]

This is exactly what you expect and need it to be, once you realize it is more Calendar Girls than GI Jane. It’s heart-warming, at times raw, and just a bit manipulative. What else would you expect from the hands of Peter Cattaneo, director of The Full Monty? This time round he delivers a feel-good, fictionalized account of military wives in the UK that formed the first wives’ choir. Sometimes “feel-good” is enough, but it isn’t all the movie has to offer.

The real reason to see the movie, other than to escape the current day-to-day, is to watch the journeys of Kristin Scott Thomas (The Valet) and Sharon Horgan (Game Night). Each of these women chart a course and evolution on screen that is magnetic, from their opening clashes to their inevitable understanding. In addition there is the simple delivery of Amy James-Kelly (Gentleman Jack) which is nicely understated without losing its power.

The rest, to be honest, you’ve seen before. These movies have a rhythm and a point, and they’ll wring you dry and make you laugh in alternate waves. They are cathartic and satisfying and I’ve no bones against them, but it isn’t something new, it’s just something comforting. The added benefit of some solid performances makes it one you should queue up. And, these days as I’ve said, sometimes comforting is enough anyway.

Military Wives Poster

Ladrones

[3 stars]

This silly heist film never quite finds solid ground, but it manages to stay entertaining, in a broad kind of way. To anticipate the sense of this film, understand that director Joe Menendez is best known for TV shows like Siren and From Dusk to Dawn; entertaining, yes, but not exactly top of the heap.

If you approach this as a less capable A-Team, with silly choices, marginal acting, weak script, and absurd science you’ll do fine. The good guys do win and the bad guys are humiliated; sometimes that’s enough. To be fair, it also has a bit of a message to go with it. But I can’t recommend this with any kind of real conviction. You’ll have to decide that on your own.

Ladrones Poster

A few misses…

Like many, I’m finding myself casting about for things to watch. And now, more than ever, I’m seeking out things at the fringes looking for something new and unique. In some cases I’ve been lucky: Palm Springs, Precarious, See You Yesterday, The Vast of Night.

But to find those, I had to watch many others, and not all measured up. Here are a few of my recent misses. I want to be clear, I respect all of their creators and efforts, but they each failed for me for different reasons.

Making Time
This is another in the many tales of time looping relationship tales. It was the first film I tried the night I found the much superior Time Freak. I made it about 25 minutes into this very low-budget indie before bailing. It was clearly tongue-in-cheek, but it also failed to find solid footing that I could believe in. After 20 minutes, I still didn’t care a whit about the main character or his predicament. The main government characters were being played to be absurd rather than at all threatening or supportive. The romance at the crux of it all just wasn’t believable. There is some talent in the film making, but I wasn’t about to make any more time for it myself. 

Space Captain: Captain of Space!
This is a great joke of a film…for about 15 – 20 minutes. Honestly, it is. But a whole feature of low-budget, Flash Gordon satire? No, sorry, it just doesn’t sustain. At least not for me. Definitely give it a go if you enjoy the silly. They knew what they had, they did a fabulous job of picking up the sense and sensibility of the era, and found a look and feel that was just perfect. But, like many an SNL skit, it just had nowhere to go, but insists on continuing regardless. I bailed out, but I wasn’t sorry I tuned in for at least a chunk of it.

The Barrier
There are some good ideas in The Barrier. Not great ones as they’re all pretty tired now, but some good ones. And Netflix, who premiered it, is smartly doling out this post-pandemic, grim dystopia weekly. I think binging it would cause mental harm with today’s situation. But the real challenge for me is that it’s really a telenovela at heart. It starts more subtle, but by the end of the first episode it is so arch and obvious I just couldn’t return. This is really a matter of taste and need rather than a comment on quality. So if you like that kind of serial, give it a shot. I just had to run away.

 

Enola Holmes

[4.5 stars]

Was there ever any doubt that Millie Bobby Brown (Godzilla: King of Monsters) had the chops to carry a movie? And what a wonderful vehicle she has found. Not only does she own the screen with her charisma and chops, but her character drives the tale, pushing her brothers Mycroft and Sherlock to the periphery, making it a decidedly female-driven story.

Sam Claflin (Charlie’s Angels) is a perfectly uptight Mycroft, while Henry Cavill (Witcher) is the thoroughly self-absorbed, but surprisingly available Sherlock. Throw in Helena Bonham Carter (Ocean’s 8) as their rather unique mum, and you’ve a family to be reckoned with…and likely a good salary for a mental health professional. But all their performances are tightly controlled under Fleabag  director Harry Bradbeer’s entirely capable hands.

Despite these lofty names in her family, the story really focuses more on her adventures with the young Louis Partridge; Enola’s master-in-distress. The story manages to both lean into and avoid the young love tropes without making it insulting to either of them. And with Burn Gorman (Pacific Rim: Uprising) constantly at their heels to push along the danger, there are adventures to be had.

The cast is also chock full of other great talents to help buoy the film. Adeel Akhtar (Murder Mystery), Susan Wokoma (Crazyhead), Fiona Shaw (Killing Eve), and Frances de la Tour (The Lady in the Van) help fill out the film with known and unknown characters from the Holmesian universe.

But it isn’t just all fun and games (afoot). Enola Holmes is a timely flick, in more than one way…and the fun is watching all that play out. The adaptation from Nancy Springer’s series by Jack Thorne (Radioactive) is wonderfully on point for current needs. And the result is also an example of what Netflix can find when it really tries, though it’s a shame this never saw the big screen. I think this film could have found an audience. Certainly the cinematography was with the larger format in mind, though it plays perfectly well on a home setup.

Make time for this one, whether you’ve a young woman at home with you or not. It’s fun, wry, sly, and full of adventure; perfect for a light escape that won’t insult your intelligence. And to see Brown beginning to come into her own just adds to the icing on this slightly savory confection.

Time Freak

[4 stars]

Romance, comedy, and time travel, especially when wrapped in honesty and told with some intelligence, is a triumverate always guaranteed to grab my attention. Unlike the recent Palm Springs, the character intent here is deliberate, but they both deliver the story in a similar way that let’s you connect with it immediately and get on board for the ride.

The story, despite its scope, is really driven by just three characters. Asa Butterfield (Slaughterhouse Rulez) and Sophie Turner (X-Men: Dark Phoenix) are the romantic crux of the story. And while that may sound like an odd combo, it’s supposed to be. And yet the two have a believable chemistry between them. More surprisingly, it comes mostly from Turner’s performance, which is the best I’ve seen her do. I actually believed her completely, something all of her previous performances have lacked for me. Butterfield is playing into his strengths in this film, but does so with heartfelt earnestness that wins you over.

While the main couple certainly carries the story forward and keeps it focused, Skyler Gisondo (Santa Clarita Diet) adds the final element that makes it all work: comic relief and, often, common sense. This is especially amusing as he’s a complete screw-up. This isn’t the basis for comedy I usually enjoy, but it works here due to its restraint and evolution. Even Will Peltz’s (In Time) side character, as extreme as he takes it, manages to find ground often enough to add to the depth of the tale rather than distract from it.

Writer/director Andrew Bowler expanded his Oscar nominated short into this truly delightful and funny exploration of life, love, and relationships. The cleverly written script spends the first third in familiar territory. And, honestly, even if it hadn’t expanded on that, I would have enjoyed the movie thanks to his control of the performances and pace. But it is Bowler’s willingness to try to explore the characters and plot more deeply that makes this particular run at the sub-genre something worth seeing.

When you need something enjoyable and not entirely devoid of logic and intelligence, queue this one up. You won’t be sorry.

Wait for Your Laugh

[4 stars]

Rose Marie was a fixture in comedy for close to 90 years in the industry. She was one of the original megastars of vaudeville and radio, and transitioned to TV and film without missing a beat. But that’s what she accomplished, not who she was. She was also a fascinating character with a life you couldn’t invent and be believed.

This documentary by Jason Wise and partner Christina Wise is funny, well-paced, and a great overview of the entertainment industry as it evolved. And for those that only grew up knowing Rose Marie as the sharp-tongued, gravelly voiced actor from Hollywood Squares, it will probably be revelatory.

But beyond the factual, this is also a wonderful tale of love, endurance, and persistence. It’s a reminder that life is constant change and effort…but doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy it along the way. When you need a break from all the craziness, this is a wonderful distraction.

Red Dwarf: The Promised Land (series 13)

[3 stars]

Way back in 1988, an outrageous show began with the spilling of a bowl of gazpacho. 32 years and 13 series later,  it’s still carrying on with a fan base to help it stay on its feet.

In their latest series, much like series 9’s Back to Earth, it’s a single, movie-length story rather than a bunch of episodes. Is it brilliant? Well, no, but it is a solid callback to its roots and with their particular vein humor that you’ll recognize.

Sure, you can write some of the dialogue before it’s even spoken, but that’s part of the comforting charm if you’re a fan. And comfort comedy is something very necessary these days. So heat up a vindaloo and pull up a seat for an evening of fun and silliness; if you’ve been looking for a Red Dwarf fix, this will scratch that itch. And if you’ve never found Red Dwarf, go back to the beginning and enjoy the ride… this will be waiting for you when you’re ready.

Red Dwarf Poster