Tag Archives: Dark Comedy

Space Force

[2 stars]

OK, I’m throwing in the towel on this one.

Up front, I am not and never was an Office fan. The humor just never worked for me…not that I hadn’t lived the cube-life at points, and not that I hadn’t seen a good deal of the truth in the satire. However, mean humor just doesn’t entertain me, it angers me. So, sort of counter-productive. Because of that, it was with trepidation that I entered into the world of Space Force. And it was pure stubbornness that I delayed and delayed this write up trying to watch more of the show even though it left me empty of joy.

What made The Office work was its core truth and that its audience knew, and had internalized, that truth. This satire has none of that advantage. It needed to find something more human for us to latch onto. Frankly, it reminds me of a lot of the issues Avenue 5 has.

The fact is, at least in this household, that despite a cast packed with talent, the show feels surprisingly lifeless. It has moments, but because it isn’t in a familiar setting, and because its inception itself feels like a national joke (something they lean into), it’s hard to relate to or support the characters. We may understand the military, but most of us don’t live it, unlike office life. In other words, we can’t quite grasp all of the intent and, frankly, based on some of the people I know, I know they got a lot of it completely wrong.

With all that said, I couldn’t make it past the second episode, even with John Malkovich (Velvet Buzzsaw) chewing up the scenery in a most satisfactory way. I tried. You may find it more to your liking than I did…humor is highly individual, afterall.

He Died With a Falafel in His Hand

[3 stars]

I know, I know. This has been on my list for years, but I hadn’t gotten to it until now. And it was entertaining, if a little out of time (especially one or two very un-woke scenes that couldn’t be done now).

I have to admit, I’ve no idea what attracted director/writer Richard Lowenstein to adapt this odd travelogue of life through the eyes of a slacker. Especially as his main focus has been music videos for years. But something about the story spoke to him. I can’t say the characters or story spoke much to me, but the presentation and path of the story kept me mostly entertained.

Noah Taylor (Free Fire) plays it all with a flat, who cares sort of attitude, even while clearly wishing there was something more. And in his wake drift several people who keep washing up on his shores, for better or worse. Emily HamiltonRomane Bohringer, and Brett Stewart continually bounce off Taylor’s character, changing with each encounter, even as he remains primarily unaffected and unchanged. But Taylor watches and clearly considers each evolution even when he’s unsure in what way to react to it all.

It has a resolution of sorts. It isn’t overly satisfying, or wasn’t for me, but the journey was amusing, if both dark and a little gratuitously violent at times. And I didn’t feel like it ever got to any substantial point (even if I did see the visual joke and commentary). This is definitely a movie that many will enjoy and just as many will find inscrutable. You’re just going to have to make up your own mind.

He Died with a Felafel in His Hand Poster

Birds of America

[3 stars]

Like loving family, watching this film is a bit of an act of faith. Elyse Friedman’s script feels like it is going nowhere fun or interesting for the first 3/4 of the story…and then it all comes together in both expected and unexpected ways.

Matthew Perry serves as the reluctant patriarch for his younger, orphaned sibs: Ben Foster (Leave No Trace) and Ginnifer Goodwin (Zootopia). The three form a very broken triangle of humanity and reaction to grief. And, along the way, they find a way forward.

There are also some nice side performances by the three wives of the piece: Lauren Graham (Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist) as Perry’s wife, Zoë Kravitz (High Fidelity) as Foster’s, and Hilary Swank (I Am Mother) as the neighbor.’s For Kravitz, it was also one of her earliest roles.

Director Craig Lucas, really much better known for his writing (Prelude to a Kiss, Longtime Companion), handles the oddities and extremes of the story fairly well. Some of the comedy is a little pushed, but mostly it is kept to just this side of uncomfortably real. And he manages to overcome some of the incomplete aspects of the script; the dangling threads of ideas. But, despite getting the relationships and characters nailed down nicely, Friedman’s script has issues. The title and opening explanation, in particular, lay out some very specific plot points that never get taken up. It is a complete mis-lead who’s resolution was either left on the cutting room floor or simply lost in revision and never fully corrected in the final cut for some reason.

Even with the weaknesses, if you trust it, the movie pays off. But, like family, unconditional trust can be tough at times. I’m sure neither Lucas or Friedman intended a physical metaphor for their tale, but they got one anyway.

Birds of America Poster

Some COVID Fun – No, Really

There has been a wave of lock-down art recently. Well, what do you expect with a bunch of artists stuck at home with no outlet? Even the some finales (like All Rise) embraced the situation and wrote it into their tales.

Most of it has come in the form of at-home/garage concerts up till now. But, recently, a number of short video stories have begun to surface.

While there are many, these two really stood out. One for its sheer amusement and the other for its scope. Both are BBC, but I would expect them to be more generally available at some point.

Staged

What happens when David Tennant (Doctor Who, Good Omens) and Michael Sheen (Slaughterhouse Rulez) try to mount a play during the lock-down? Well, with the help of relatively unknown Simon Evans as writer/director/actor and their families, hilarity ensues. This series, comprised of 6 short episodes is self-aware, self-deprecating, and utterly irreverent. Find it…and remember to pay attention to and watch through the credits. The fun just keeps on giving while touching on the realities of the world as it is being reshaped.

Staged Poster

Unprecedented 

There are too many people involved here to list. In several half-hour episodes, each comprised of 3 10-minute plays, you see a huge scope of pandemic life. Some of it is is funny, some uncomfortable, and some just poignant, but all are worth seeing and none are so long as to get boring.

Unprecedented: Real Time Theatre from a State of Isolation Poster

American Adobo

[3 stars]

This isn’t a great film. The script, by first-timer Vincent R. Nebrida, is painful at times. And the effort to overcome those lacks by director Laurice Guillen doesn’t help her break into the States, despite being widely celebrated in the Philippines and abroad. Even the fairly experienced cast had trouble finding an even rhythm and delivery.

But, there is a sweetness to the story and the performances that made it engaging. Certainly the peek into Philippine culture was interesting (even if aspects were overblown at times). In between cringing at the dialogue and some of the acting, it will reach you and make you smile as you grow to understand this group of friends who bond over the past and food while negotiating their way into their futures.

American Adobo Poster

Rim of the World

[3 stars]

Kid’s films are hard. Getting the balance of humor, action, language, not to mention age appropriate plot is a delicate balance. Zack Stentz’s (X-Men: First Class) script delivers a tween-level tale and language. Just enough action and language and challenge to sate a 13-year-old’s sense of adventure. Director McG (Three Days to Kill) pushed a bit hard on the broad humor, as he often does, but for this audience, he probably did good.

The result is an amusing, if utterly improbable, kids save the world adventure, with some nice bends in the typical characters. For example the main kick-ass in the group is the miniscule Miya Cech (The Darkest Minds). She also delivers almost all the best lines and keeps her wits about her to keep the group going.

The rest of the gang is the typical rag-tag Goonies-like group. Jack Gore (Ideal Home) takes the main focus. He has the only fully realized character in the movie, and the fullest arc, but it isn’t the most sparkling (which is Cech). He’s joined by Alessio Scalzotto, in a thin role covering the LatinX community, and Benjamin Flores Jr. covering the Black community. Flores, in particular, should slap McG silly for how he had him attack his character. It’s beyond painful at times.

But all of the weaknesses aside (and they are legion) the movie somehow remains entertaining and engaging. It has good production values, a high octane plot, big stakes, and makes adults look helpless. What more does a tween want in an adventure film where they get to be heroes? What’s a shame is that it could have been so much more if they’d approached it in earnest rather than in satire.

Rim of the World Poster

The Lovebirds

[3 stars]

Sometimes the whole isn’t more than the sum of its parts.

Lovebirds is at times a sweet and, at times, a painful romcom that never really comes together. It works best when Kumail Nanjiani (Men in Black: International) and Issa Rae (Little) are being honest with one another as characters. When they’re trying to out-comedy one another, it just falls apart, losing steam and focus while adding nothing really of value. Had that been more constrained and used more precisely by director Michael Showalter (The Big Sick), it might have worked.

What is scary is that this was supposed to release in theaters till the pandemic hit. It was one of the first big films to dump plans and go straight to a streaming service. It was a definitely a better choice for it as it would have done middling, at best, out in the theaters. As part of Netflix, it’s level of quality is acceptable if disappointing.

(Side Note: I really hope that they start raising the bar a bit more on their acquisitions. I love the breadth of material they offer, especially the foreign fare, but their ability to recognize quality is definitely suspect far too often).

For an evening where you can’t find anything else or when you want a story that requires no effort or investment with a bit of humor (a very little bit), this will suffice. I did, afterall, watch the whole thing. But, honestly, you deserve and can do better.

The Lovebirds

Hannah Gadsby: Douglas

[4.5 stars]

In her follow-up to Nannette, Gadsby once-again defies tradition and description. It isn’t quite the power-blast of Nannette, but it is a brilliantly structured piece of comedy. She starts exactly where she needs to and drags you laughing through to the end, pulling everything together as she does.

Whether or not you liked Nannette, you should see Douglas. It has its serious comments, but it is very much a comedy special put together with deft hands and a wickedly sharp mind.

[But if you haven’t seen Nannette as well, you should. It is a different animal, but it is a brilliantly, near-perfect, piece of stage craft.  It isn’t comedy, per se, but it is funny, and cathartic, and a wonder to behold]

Hannah Gadsby: Douglas

A Face in the Crowd

[4 stars]

Back in 1957 Budd Schulberg wrote a script that was disturbingly prescient; though it would seem to presage Regan more than 45 in the arc of it all. Still, his understanding of the power of media was spot on. I can only imagine that he’d be disappointed to learn that B-rolls and hot mic’s no longer seem to matter, and their truth can’t shake the machine.

With Elia Kazan at the helm, and a solid cast, the story is a swift couple hours about the rise and fall of Andy Griffith’s Lonesome Rhodes. Griffith is more than a little larger than life and broad in his performance (and perhaps a little loud) but it works. And he does manage to slip levels into there. Patricia Neal is a conundrum in the tale, being both the instigator of it all and his rock, but then somehow diminishing into a more typical female stereotype of the era. It works, in its way, but is also the weakest aspect of the story.

In a surprisingly quiet and atypical role there is Walter Matthau and also a very young Lee Remick, among others. And watch out for Mike Wallace and Walter Winchell playing themselves.

A Face in the Crowd is a compelling movie even more than 60 years later. Sure it is a little stagey, but the points are amazingly on target, and the journey clips along so quickly that it pulls you to the inevitable end without lagging.

A Face in the Crowd

Plus One (+1)

[2.5 stars]

There is a definite How to Talk to Girls at Parties gone very dark here. Rather than a sweet, if odd, tale of self-discovery begun at an epic house party, this edges into horror. And not particularly satisfying or scary horror at that. It is more suspense and mystery horror, leading to a real moment, but somewhat ponderously getting there.

The cast is relatively untried. Only Logan Miller (Being Frank) stands out. But, I will admit, that Colleen Dengel (Damsels in Distress) and Natalie Hall get some unexpected moments. However the main action is driven by a rather weak Rhys Wakefield. The story is very much on his shoulders and only works if his path makes sense and if we have any sympathy for him. We don’t. Not at all. And without that, the whole house of cards collapses at the end.

To be fair to Wakefield, director Dennis Iliadis (Last House on the Left) took Bill Gullo’s (The Quitter) script and followed its lead, but left it stilted on screen. He didn’t help his actors find their truths in the way he needed to sell what could have been a wonderfully creepy and psychologically challenging tale. He did, at least, keep the story clear in the midst of a complicated concept.  And the script, while clever in idea, doesn’t quite go all the places it could have to make it richer and more interesting.

I can’t say I recommend this one, but some may find it satisfying. It has moments if not a completely satisfying delivery. If you gravitate to teen splatter horror (which this isn’t, per se, but it bumps against those tropes) you’re more likely to find it fun.

+1