Tag Archives: Foreign

Roadkill

[3 stars]

There is a structure and a rhythm to a David Hare (Collateral) story. They are dark labyrinths of human failure and misunderstanding leading to outrageous, if inevitable and believable, outcomes.  And not all of the events in his tales are explained or even have direct motive…some things just happen…though they are often attributed to someone’s motivation. In other words, his stories tend to be dark, fun, and more reflective of real life than some may find comfortable.

His latest, Roadkill, is another political thriller that has only two possible outcomes for its four-part series. Either remains possible till close to the end. And by keeping it to only four episodes, it doesn’t feel overly oppressive or drawn out. His director, Michael Keillor (Strike: Cuckoo’s Calling), drives the tension and tale with a confident hand.

Through it all, and at the center, Hugh Laurie (Avenue 5) proves again what a magnetic and smarmy bastard he can be as a character. Laurie’s character is assuredly a stand-in for some current world leaders, though with considerably more intelligence and ability. It makes him even more plausible and scarier than the truth. He’s supported by a solid cast. Iain De Caestecker (Overlord), as his right-hand, Helen McCrory (Loving Vincent) as the PM, with Sidse Babett Knudsen (Inferno) and Saskia Reeves (The Child in Time) on his homefronts are some of the standouts. But these are far from the only good performances. Hare attracts good people and his scripts provide deep characters to play with.

For a short dive into murky waters, Roadkill provides a fascinating escape and set of insights. It isn’t so long as to get suffocating, but it is long enough to allow the story to breathe. If you’re able to handle a dark political bit of suspense and mystery with a thick human element, give it a shot.

Roadkill Poster

Sputnik

[3.5 stars]

Titles are important. They can illuminate, entertain, or confuse. It’s important that, in this case, you go in knowing that Sputnik doesn’t refer to the infamous satellite, but to its translation: travelling companion.  It’s especially important as the story is set in 1983, suggesting an historical context, and because it starts in space, further confusing things. So dump all that baggage and go with the movie as it is, which is really quite good.

The movie is the solid expansion of an award winning short (The Passenger) by the triumvirate of director Egor Abramenko, and writers Oleg Malovichko, and Andrey Zolotarev. The three have all worked together for years.

The cast is quite small and is dominated by just a few performances. It’s primarily driven by Oksana Akinshina, who packs multiple layers underneath an adamantine exterior. Her performance bounces off the solid deliveries and reflections of Fedor Bondarchuk and Pyotr Fyodorov to create a movie that rises above its genre.

At its core, this is really just another space creature feature. But it is adorned with more than the typical human elements and clever consideration of the science. It isn’t perfect, but this one is definitely a step above similar tales. If you like suspense/horror/scifi offerings at all, make the time for this one. It will surprise you and is even worthy of rewatch.

Keep an eye on what comes next from the creative team. They work well together and clearly put the effort into their films to make them something special.

Sputnik Poster

A One Lane Mystery Road

I’ve grouped these two mystery series because they have some similarities. The common thread, despite the difference in country, is indigenous peoples. In fact, the main detective in both series represents this oft time side-lined culture. Interestingly, they have similar sensibilities, though very different tenors.

One Lane Bridge

This is the inaugural series of what is somewhere between a rough-edged mystery, similar to many Northern England shows like Shetland or Hinterland, but with a bit of aboriginal mythos thrown in. It has a few recognizable faces, if you watch New Zealand shows. The basic story is a simple family murder. Dominic Ona-Ariki (Filthy Rich) gets it as his first case in the remote town to which he’s moved.

Among the faces you might know are Joel Tobeck (The Blake Mysteries: Ghost Story), Alison Bruce (Top of the Lake), and Michelle Langstone (800 Words). They also have some of the more complicated story lines, though they aren’t the main focus of the story.

We don’t really get to know much of why Ariki’s there in series 1, nor much about his background. He does, however, solve the season’s mystery so nothing of importance is left hanging. But a lot is held back and many things are clearly queued up for a second series. Despite the grit and anger of it all, I’d be back to see what they can make of it. The characters are rich and full of stories.

Mystery Road

And speaking of grit and anger, this second season of the movie adaptation of this series is just full of it. Aaron Pedersen (The Code) returns as the swaggering, grumpy loner who’s trying to single-handedly clean up the Australian outback and northern coast. Tasma Walton (Cleverman) returns as his frustrated ex-wife and Sofia Helin (The Bridge) joins as one of the principle variables, which was certainly a draw for me.

This is a heavy feeling storyline of angry people and nefarious doings. But there are interesting characters and fascinating insights into culture that you won’t get anywhere else. I can’t take too much of it at once… the writing often makes choices for the convenience of the action, rather than what people would normally do, but it’s entertaining and even spiked with adrenaline at times.

One Lane Bridge Mystery Road Poster

Ted Lasso

[4 stars]

I can’t believe I’m endorsing this show (it was inspired by an ad campaign, for cryin’ out loud), but I am. I never thought it would be something I could watch; Jason Sudeikis (Colossal), just isn’t my usual cup of tea.

But that’s thing about Ted Lasso, while Sudeikis and Brendan Hunt are earnest and interesting and really sell their characters, it isn’t their show. The story is really about all the people around them, and those actors play it genuinely and beautifully. Hannah Waddingham (Sex Education), Juno Temple (Wonder Wheel), Brett Goldstein (Uncle), Jeremy Swift (Stonewall), and Nick Mohammed (The Martian) bring a host of different stories and reactions to keep you hooked. In fact, the humor is often fall-off-the-couch funny, and the honest moments are, well sometimes the same, but just as often incredibly affecting.

Frankly, I’m not a sports guy. Prior to this, the only series that ever managed to overcome my aversion to sports stories was Sports Night. But Lasso managed some of the same magic…making the story about everything other than the sport involved and getting me to care.

Lasso is already renewed for two more seasons, it’s worth your time and it’s the perfect antidote for the dark and stressful times around us. I just hope they can keep up the story and the writing.

Ted Lasso Poster

Made in Dagenham

[3.5 stars]

OK, yeah, this is very much in the framework of Norma Rae, and full of the same kinds of evolution and moments. But not only is this depiction of female empowerment in 1968 Dagenham true, it brought about real and permanent change to both England and most of the industrialized world (other than the US who still doesn’t have an equal pay law over 50 years later). Not that Rae’s inspiration, Crystal Lee Sutton, didn’t have impact, but it was nothing like this.

Sally Hawkins (Godzilla: King of Monsters) leads the story as an unassuming wife who finds her voice and stands up for, as she puts it, basic rights. The cast is chock full of talent, but it all centers on Hawkins and Daniel Mays’ (The Limehouse Golem) family.

As you’d expect, the rest of the cast is dominated by some great female performers: Rosamund Pike (State of the Union), Geraldine James (Anne (Anne with an E)), Andrea Riseborough (Mandy), and Miranda Richardson (Good Omens) to name a few. However, Bob Hoskins (Hollywoodland) and Richard Schiff (Shock and Awe) are worth mentioning among the male cast, though far from the only good talent.

Dagenham is exactly what you want it to be, with a bit of British grit thrown in. Much like Military Wives or its similar tale in Pride, it allows some real-life to intrude into the retelling. But the bones of the story are true. The timing of my viewing is also actually quite relevant, with the election just days away.

Because it is formulaic, for good and ill, I can’t rate the movie higher as a movie. But director Nigel Cole (Doc Martin, Calendar Girls) gave us a reminder of not only what is possible but also what is still so very wrong; with the US in particular though I’m sure that wasn’t his intention. But it is an uplifting movie, all the more for its honesty and resolution. And it’s a flick you’ll finish with a feeling of empowerment and joy.

Made in Dagenham Poster

Ugetsu (Ugetsu monogatari)

[3 stars]

War sucks. Men are greedy. Money’s pointless. Women can save us (at a cost to themselves). Love is forever. Fate’s a bitch.

That about sums up this 1953 adaptation of classic fables by Kenji Mizoguchi in one of his last films. Basically this is a ghost story, in the traditional Japanese sense, which made for some appropriate October viewing.

But I can’t say I recommend the film other than to film buffs or historians. While beautifully filmed, it’s slow, marginally acted, and barely gripping. Some of this is style choice, to be sure. However, that doesn’t mean it survived the years well. This one is definitely a choice you’ll have to make for yourself.

Ugetsu Poster

Tiramisu (Luen oi hang sing)

[3 stars]

For a good part of this story, I was willingly transported on an elegiac fantasy about love and art. Two people meet, by accident, make a connection and then, well, weirdness and the unexpected occur. It is very much a Chinese myth and story, right through to the end. But, this is a modern framing for myths you may know, and some that are made up. It isn’t full-on magic and weirdness, but stays focused on the characters and their relationships, with just enough oddness to keep it all unique.

Dante Lam directs with an open heart and love for the characters and with an artist’s mind. The result turns Kin Chung Chan’s script into something quite beautiful and, often, funny. Nicholas Tse and Kar Yan Lam work well together keeping the story light, but intense. Their side-kicks, Candy Lo and Eason Chan, help kick it along as well, though Chan is more than a little over the top.

For something a little different, with a solidly recognizable thread, this was fun. Though I will admit that it sort of falls apart at the end. I would have laid out the last few moments differently, both for consistency and to carry through the themes, but it still works emotionally. For a light-ish romantic tale with some classic overtones, check it out sometime.

Chef’s Special (Fuera de Carta)

[2.5 stars]

Just how broad do you like your comedy? If you’re planning to come here for a feast, be prepared for something more Chuck E. Cheese than Four Seasons.

If you know me, you know that restaurant movies tend to get my attention. I love the environment and, particularly, watching the food being conceived and prepared. When provided enough of that  I’ll even, usually, give the action and story that surround it a bit of a break.

Sadly, director Nacho G. Velilla (No Manches Frida) couldn’t decide if he was going to give us a farce or a force for change in this tale from the other side of the passthrough. In the end, it’s just an unpalatable melange that barely held my attention and interest. The acting was only a notch above telenovela in its shrill delivery, though the messages and the intended heart were much more human, and the story was an oversimplified mess.

Unfortunately, in the end, this movie is a meal that leaves you wanting. It has neither a believable tale, nor does it give us enough about the food to keep the audience sated. Frankly, if it had been about 25 minutes shorter, I’d be less critical. In its lack of focus, there are a number of storylines and setups for emotional payoffs that just aren’t worth the effort. Coming in at close to 2 hours, the movie just can’t sustain.

Now, if you like broad, silly comedy that occasionally touches down in reality and that has a sort of positive message, this may be for you. It really wasn’t for me.

Chef's Special Poster

Military Wives

[3 stars]

This is exactly what you expect and need it to be, once you realize it is more Calendar Girls than GI Jane. It’s heart-warming, at times raw, and just a bit manipulative. What else would you expect from the hands of Peter Cattaneo, director of The Full Monty? This time round he delivers a feel-good, fictionalized account of military wives in the UK that formed the first wives’ choir. Sometimes “feel-good” is enough, but it isn’t all the movie has to offer.

The real reason to see the movie, other than to escape the current day-to-day, is to watch the journeys of Kristin Scott Thomas (The Valet) and Sharon Horgan (Game Night). Each of these women chart a course and evolution on screen that is magnetic, from their opening clashes to their inevitable understanding. In addition there is the simple delivery of Amy James-Kelly (Gentleman Jack) which is nicely understated without losing its power.

The rest, to be honest, you’ve seen before. These movies have a rhythm and a point, and they’ll wring you dry and make you laugh in alternate waves. They are cathartic and satisfying and I’ve no bones against them, but it isn’t something new, it’s just something comforting. The added benefit of some solid performances makes it one you should queue up. And, these days as I’ve said, sometimes comforting is enough anyway.

Military Wives Poster

Ladrones

[3 stars]

This silly heist film never quite finds solid ground, but it manages to stay entertaining, in a broad kind of way. To anticipate the sense of this film, understand that director Joe Menendez is best known for TV shows like Siren and From Dusk to Dawn; entertaining, yes, but not exactly top of the heap.

If you approach this as a less capable A-Team, with silly choices, marginal acting, weak script, and absurd science you’ll do fine. The good guys do win and the bad guys are humiliated; sometimes that’s enough. To be fair, it also has a bit of a message to go with it. But I can’t recommend this with any kind of real conviction. You’ll have to decide that on your own.

Ladrones Poster