Tag Archives: SeeIt

Death Note (2017)

[3 stars]

Death Note has had many incarnations: manga, anime, live action (twice over with this entry, and the previous one was a trilogy). It is a great story that continues to draw an audience. Each version had its own focus and sensibility, but the overall message remained the same throughout: With great power comes great decompensation.

Basically, given the ultimate power over life and death, what would happen to a teen…y’know that age when we’re all so incredibly stable as it is. Let’s face it, it isn’t a pretty concept, but it is a fascinating ethical problem.

Nat Wolf (The Intern) and Margaret Qualley (The Nice Guys) make an interesting Bonnie and Clyde (or Sid and Nancy) combo. Each plays their part and path well without overselling it. Having them grounded really brings out the horror of what happens as the story progresses. And Wingard has plenty of blood and creative carnage to accompany the tale. And Willem Dafoe’s (The Great Wall) vocal talents to help drive the amused bedlam.

Lakeith Stanfield (Get Out) as L is a bit less believable for me. The character is already an absurdist rendition of an OCD hacker, but that seems to work fine in Anime. And the previous live action versions toned him down a little to get to believability. In this production he starts odd, and gets even odder. It is a good counter-point to the ethical dilemma about abuse of power, but Stanfield just didn’t sell me with his delivery that this person could really exist.

I was concerned that the 100 minute treatment of the first part of this tale would feel thin or overly compressed. But director Adam Wingard (You’re Next) took the script from the combined efforts of the writers of Immortals and Fantastic Four (not great bona fides) and wrangled it into something really pretty engaging.

Death Note

Happy Accidents

[3.5 stars]

One of the joys of this film is that it plays directly into the need for love to matter. Yes, I’ve already admitted I’m a hopeless romantic, so that is going to play well for me. Also, it has a great deal of sadly accurate fun with NYC dating and living.

Marissa Tomei (Spider-Man: Homecoming) and Vincent D’Onofrio (Emerald City) make the unlikeliest of pairs, but they make it work. You believe in the ineffable attraction and the unbridled passion that drives the two of them together, even if you don’t understand it. Both players have complicated histories and manage that rough hulled vulnerability that they are known for.

There are some great supporting roles as well. Holland Taylor (D.E.B.S.) does something just a bit different for her typical characters. And Nadia Dajani gets to do a bit more than here typical TV supporting roles. But, as Tomei’s mother, it was Tovah Feldshuh who really got to make an impact, with very little screen time; she is a wonderful study in restraint.

Writer/director Brad Anderson (The Call) is no stranger to the odd. His previous Next Stop Wonderland and The Machinist each have elements you can see him developing further with this offering. While Anderson spends most of his time on TV projects, his screen projects always seem to hit a decent mark. He loves his characters, which saves them, or at least redeems them in some way, for us regardless of their circumstances.

Happy Accidents is one of those curl-up-on-the-couch films with someone to enjoy the ride and message. It isn’t a simple and easy romance, but it has its impact and some good performances from actors earlier in their careers. It also gives you a chance to see a new and different facet of Anderson’s work.

Happy Accidents

Summer Hours (L’heure d’été)

[3 stars]

Olivier Assayas (Clouds of Sils Maria) wrote and directed this  deceptively simple, and highly awarded, story about family several years back. I say “deceptively” because there are layers to this story that are unavoidable, even if they aren’t Assayas’s main focus.

On the surface we have Edith Scob (Holy Motors) as the matriarch of a modern, dispersed family admitting and dealing with her mortality. The frank recognition of her family’s real trajectories and the “residue of the past” in the form of her house and art collection, is both honest and saddening. What she really thinks of the realities is part of what we want to know and part of what at least one of her children, Charles Berling (Elle), must contend with. Also, as the oldest, he must balance his sib’s reactions and desires. Juliet Binoche (Ghost in the Shell) and Jérémie Renier (In Bruges) balance him nicely, hinting at a deep history and long-standing disagreements that they’ve all somehow managed to balance in order to keep their relationships.

But on a deeper level, and sometimes a bit too spelled out, is the deconstruction of the collection from its human surrounds. We watch art become isolated and are forced to question the value of possessions and its meaning, absent people around it. This is true for the collection as well as the family house. While the interactions and story are certainly engaging, it was this aspect of the tale that I found most intriguing, though I wish it had been a bit subtler in the dialogue.

But Assayas wanted to focus on a different story. He was taken more with the generational aspect of life. How do things, ideas, and memories get handed down from the elders to the children. What form does that take and how does it happen? Basically, how does familial history get formed and preserved, and should it or does it need to. He explores this in various ways and to unequal effect. But the story pulls you along far enough before it simply drops you to consider life on your own. Beautifully filmed and nicely acted, it is an interlude worth the time.

Summer Hours

Vincent Has No Scales (Vincent n’a pas d’écailles)

[3 stars]

If you needed any indication of how broad the response to superhero overload is, Vincent is your answer; a quiet French indie, which shows that this trend is spreading worldwide.

Writer, director, and star Thomas Salvador takes advantage of this sensibility (and others, like The Tick) to create an ordinary man with extraordinary abilities and very little intention or need to use them in traditional ways. His adventures are a bit mundane, but also oddly sweet with Vimala Pons (Elle). It is, at heart, a simple love story; we all have secrets. That Salvador could wear all those production hats and still pull this film off in a credible way is impressive.

Deadpool signaled the mainstream embrace of the counter-superhero (as opposed to anti(super)hero, because I think it is more about story telling than good vs evil). And I expect the super hero backlash will continue to build, which isn’t a bad thing. Marvel will continue to ride the wave better than most because they never took themselves too seriously (unlike DC). But this shift in thinking is opening the possibility for more inventive and smaller stories like Vincent. For an evening of romantic 30charm and silly comedy that borders on farce at times, this will suit.

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Short Term 12

[3 stars]

Did you miss this movie when it came out? As emotionally challenging as it is, I wish I hadn’t. Writer/director Destin Daniel Cretton pours his heart and soul into creating a clear-eyed look into the kids and support staff of the foster system, group homes in particular. The home is a forced collection of odd and broken characters helping one another survive amidst hopelessness. It is people forcing past their own pain to help others. It is inspirational and depressing all at once, though ultimately positive. 

Brie Larson (Free Fire) and John Gallagher (10 Cloverfield Lane) form the core story. Through them we get the needed lensing and reflection on the stories and situations in the group home where they work. They are dedicated and patient as only a fellow ‘inmate’ can be. Their stories become part of the bigger whole.  Alongside these two, Kaitlyn Dever (Men, Women, Children) brings her considerable chops. As catalyst, she manages to both stand out in her own plot without overwhelming the rest of the story.

Seeing this four years after its release did have one odd impact. Rami Malek (Mr Robot) has a small and, frankly, uninteresting part in the film. However, due to his current celebrity, I kept expecting so much more from his character, which speaks to his presence on screen more than his efforts in this film.

Make time for this movie if you did miss it. It is well constructed, written, and acted, but it is just a bit too real and intense. I don’t need to revisit it voluntarily, but it was definitely a trip worth making once. I’m looking forward now to seeing Cretton’s latest release, The Glass Castle, which includes some of this movie’s cast.

Short Term 12

Against the Law

[3 stars]

It is sometimes hard to remember how much the world has changed in the last 60 years. Despite recent setbacks, in general the world and humanity have matured as the distance and time between global points has diminished, and become more accepting of those around them. The sense of “otherness” is becoming common place rather than exotic. To survive, we have realized that we must embrace those around us rather than fight or feeling threatened. Hey, I did say “in general.”

But back as recently as the 1950’s, homosexuality was still a crime in most of the world, punishable by prison. Peter Wildeblood, a London journalist in that era, was caught up in the hypocrisy of his time and was part of the infamous Lord Montagu of Beaulieu trial.  Alongside Alan Turing, one of the other notable attacks on so-called inverts at the time.

Wildeblood, in this portrayal, is given life by Daniel Mays (Byzantium). He is the story, though he has some nice support from those around him. And, inter-cut into the movie are interviews with men from the era who recount their experiences and reactions. It is an interesting counterpoint but it does make the rest feel a bit more clinical than emotional, despite a rousing conclusion to the film as it comes into the present.

After prison, Wildeblood fought in the only way he knew how, by writing about his life, the trial, and declaring himself to the world and, specifically, to the Wolfenden committee. The committee ultimately declared “homosexual behaviour between consenting adults in private should no longer be a criminal offence.”

While this seemingly groundbreaking report was delivered on 4 Sept, 1957, it would be almost 10 years before the laws in Britain would begin to change. On 27 July, 1967, homosexuality between consenting adults of 21 years or older was decriminalized. And it wouldn’t be until 1994 that the law was brought into full parity with non-homosexual relationships and the age of consent dropped to age 16.  There is a wonderful overview of of non-conforming individuals in a series of monologues produced by Mark Gatiss (Denial) also in this film, called “queers.” which I highly recommend; writer Writer Brian Fillis (An Englishman in New York ) also wrote one of the monologues in queers.

Against the Law is an effective, if not entirely a solid film. Its intention is to educate and remind. On those counts it does admirably. And Mays provides a sympathetic focus, though a somewhat stunted arc as a character due to the structure. Still, I can recommend this based on his performance and the impact of the included interviews.

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The Hero

[3 stars]

Sam Elliot (Grandma) is a fixture of the last many (many) decades, probably much to his joy and chagrin. There is more than a little of him in this quiet rumination that uses film and celebrity as metaphors for life. And he is, as always, a quiet force on screen in that commanding way and with his signature deep, rumbling voice.

While this is very much a movie centered on a man, there are two notable female performances. Laura Prepon (The Girl on the Train) actually manages to steal scenes from Elliott by force of charisma alone. She has always been an intense personality and this is no exception. And, as always, she uses her chops and ability to deliver a complex character, even if there is little there to work from. Along with Prepon was a surprisingly vulnerable turn by Krysten Ritter that couldn’t be farther from her breakout Jessica Jones. This Ritter is meek and tenderly broken, despite her hostile demeanor.

After their collaboration on I’ll See You in My Dreams, Brett Haley and Marc Basch teamed up again with Haley back at the helm. In some ways, this is the reverse view of that previous story, at least in gender perspective. It is also a bit more successful overall. The two creatives make a great team and I look forward to what they produce next given their growth with each film. 

The Hero

 

Kingsman: The Golden Circle

[3.5 stars]

The first Kingsman was a delightfully unexpected and irreverent romp in spy-land. Taron Egerton (Eddie the Eagle) returns for this middle story of a planned trilogy and manages to grow the character and give us another, if much more violent, round of spy games. It may have lost some of the element of surprise, but the movie compensates with sheer audacity of spectacle and story. And everyone gets to show off a bit in this film.

On team England, Mark Strong (Miss Sloane), Sophie Cookson (Huntsman: Winters’ War), and Colin Firth (Bridget Jones’s Baby) all reprise roles adding to the mythology. But the surprise addition of Hanna Alström (Kingsman: The Secret Service) showed us that Eggsy wasn’t just a love ’em and leave ’em guy, he was capable of commitment. It is a nice flourish for his story.

Team America (1) is a bit more complex to pull apart. A great deal was made of Channing Tatum (The Hateful Eight) and Jeff Bridges (Hell or High Water), but their parts are relatively small. It is more Halle Berry (Cloud Atlas) and Pedro Pascal (The Great Wall) that drive that team. To be truthful, I wish I had known a lot less about this section of the film as it is slowly revealed over the first third of the plot, but it is impossible to not know it given the advertising and the cast.

Team America (2) is the US Government officials led by Bruce Greenwood (Spectral) and Emily Watson (Everest). Greenwood provides an ugly version of the office that was a scarily good guess at the current tenor given that it was in production during the changeover of administrations here at the time. Watson’s is an important role, but a bit of a cipher as a character, which is a shame given her abilities.

In opposition to them all are Edward Holcroft (London Spy) and Julianne Moore (Vanya on 42nd Street). Holcroft isn’t much more than a prop to bridge the movies and make it personal for Eggsy and the Kingsmen. There just isn’t much there other than anger and a desire to succeed. Julianne Moore, however, has a bit more meat on her character bones. Her speech on the motivation and plan she has put into action is one of the more interesting, subtle pieces of the social commentary that underlies this story. While she delivers it all well, there isn’t all that much for her to work with. Still, she kept it from being a cookie-cutter villainess. She also has one amusing, surprise guest with a fun story-line, but I’m not going to spoil that here.

The most interesting returnee to this universe is director and co-writer Matthew Vaughn. This is his first ever sequel. After launching Kick-Ass and X-Men: First Class, he left the franchises to others. He does a credible job coming back for this round, but he did miss a few marks. First, despite its scope, the film doesn’t feel international. It feels like Hollywood. This is in large part due to the rather nasty portrayal of the US government as well as only showing us a view of the world events via a fictionalized Fox News. “Fictionalized” as it is Fox actually doing news (rather than misreporting or opining). But there are no feeds from the other affected countries. That was a mistake I’m sure was insisted on by Fox Studios, but it really rather hurt the credibility of the tale. And Vaughn really has to stop trying to recreate his amazing “Time in a Bottle” sequence from X-Men. It just isn’t going to happen.

On a technical level, the film really excels. The script is constructed solidly to use everything as well as to redeem characters and even the golden circle symbol itself. And the editing, both between scenes and within fights, is pretty amazing. While there are moments it is very much obvious, which you don’t really want editing to be (like a couple of the cross-fades), they’re so beautifully executed that you can’t help but admire the choices. But the intra-fight editing is the real prize: is damn near seamless, which is astounding when you realize the complexity of the shots.

As a whole, this is just as entertaining as the first film in the series. It isn’t so much about discovery any longer, we’ve had our origin story after all. This round is about redemption and growth and finding a place in the world… and a whole lot of violence getting there, as adolescence often is. The film absolutely sets up a third installment, but fully resolves the story it starts in this outing. It has a ton of laughs, car chases worth of Fast & Furious or Bond, tons of flying lead and mashed bodes, and a social message that may or may not resonate for everyone, but that is certainly interesting to note. If you liked the first, you will like the second. If you haven’t found this series yet, start with The Secret Service and then return to this. While it may stand on its own, it will have a whole lot more depth with the background for you.

Kingsman: The Golden Circle

Yi Yi (a one and a two)

[3 stars]

This three hour tale from Taipei feels more like a soap opera than a movie as you sink into its humor and pathos. It even leads off with a wedding and eventually ends with a funeral. But as it moves along, it becomes more a mediation on life and family as we watch the reflections in the generations. This final, and well recognized, film by Edward Yang is huge in scope but very narrow in its messages when it finally comes down to it.

Packed with a range of new (at the time) and established faces from Taiwan and Japan, the world of the Jiang family and their friends is slowly exposed and examined. Yang also used window and mirror reflection throughout the film to remind us of this point (and to save camera set-ups, admittedly).

I want to say I understand the English translation of the title, but I’m still turning that one to try and put it in context. I suspect it is a miss-reference due to translation. It reads as a musical cue (which works, but not particularly great) rather than as, perhaps, a countdown for a picture, which is more on point in many ways. I’m just going to have to keep mulling that for now and talk to a few friends from the island to see what more I can glean.

Sadly, the transfer of the film is really pretty crude. Even for a 1999 release the encoding is very poor. However, despite that distraction, I found myself drawn into the story and engaged with the characters and their lives; eventually, even looking at my own. You have to set aside a good chunk of an evening to watch Yi Yi, but I do recommend it if you can accept its deliberate pace and quiet sensibility.

Yi Yi

Man in an Orange Shirt

[3 stars]

Man in an Orange Shirt manages to be something different than your standard coming out story. First, it spans two time periods (1940s/50s and the present), following a family line. Second, it looks beyond just the personal turmoil of the men involved.

Director Michael Samuels had some advantage tackling this kind of story having previously delivered Any Human Heart, which also spanned decades and characters. But the surprise for me here was was Patrick Gale’s script. He managed the subtleties and range of characters so well even though this was his first major script. While it feels like a standard tale at first, it takes some rather interesting turns by the end to pull everything together. It is at once romantic and bluntly honest and cruel, though it ultimately is a tale of coming to terms rather than a tragedy.

The cast has a lot to do with the success of the 2-part drama. Joanna Vanderham (What Maisie Knew), James McArdle (The Worricker Trilogy), and Oliver Jackson-Cohen (Emerald City), from the WWII era are a wonderful collection of contradictory desires and beliefs. In the present, Vanessa Redgrave (Foxcatcher), Julian Morris (Pretty Little Liars), and David Gyasi (Containment) capture current times without losing the thread to the past. 

There are also a few nice, smaller roles with Frances de la Tour (The Lady in the Van), Julian Sands (Extraordinary Tales), and Adrian Schiller (The Danish Girl). 

There are many stories about being closeted and accepting who you are. This isn’t limited to the LBGTQ experience, but that is the primary focus of stories of this sort. Man in an Orange Shirt opens itself to a broad range of emotional issues to bring you something more and different in the genre without losing its emotional impact.

Man in an Orange Shirt: The Complete Series [DVD]