Tag Archives: ShouldSee

Cardinal

Apparently, the new Norwegian substitute is Northern Canada. In this case, north of Toronto. Like Bellevue, Cardinal is a serial murder procedural in the thinly populated, icy north of Canada. Billy Campbell (Helix) and Karine Vanasse (Revenge) deliver nicely conflicted detectives in the introductory series (based on Forty Words for Sorrow) to what could be a good run of stories to come.

It is a dark tale, and a tad graphic, but all in service to understanding the characters. A good part of that darkness, and its effectiveness, is down to Brendan Fletcher (The Revenant), who has a ridiculously long cv for his career. Along with Allie MacDonald (Stories We Tell), the two are a twisted pair who we can’t help but want to watch, even if we don’t root for them.

Originally aired on CBC, it appears to be difficult to find, so the best I can say is watch for it when it airs elsewhere (and it will).

Cardinal Poster

Samurai Jack (series 5)

After a 13 year hiatus, there was definite trepidation around how this magnificent series would revive; the dead so often don’t return with their souls intact. I needn’t have worried. Despite the gap in time (appropriate in some ways) and the move to computer graphics, Samurai lost little, if any, of its original sense and sensibility. Its minimal graphics were very much in its favor, and the return of Genndy Tartakovsky to oversee and run the result kept it on track. Even the loss of Mako as the voice of the great evil Aku didn’t slow it down.

In some ways, this is the best of the series. Before it was very episodic without much of a trajectory other than the increasingly scaling fights with Aku. The universe always expanded with new characters and ongoing interactions, but seasons never felt like they had a shape. This final series has a very definite shape and a eye to its ultimate ending.

If you like Samurai Jack, you have to see the end of the saga. If you somehow missed it before, discover it now and not have to wait over a decade to have your hunger sated for an ending. Samurai remains as good as ever and as beautiful and as poetic as it began.

Samurai Jack

La La Land (redux)

I was worried this movie wouldn’t hold up to a second watch. It is, after all, a fluff movie with some sharp edges. I needn’t have worried. It still delighted and tugged at emotions and dreams in all the right ways.

It is also one of the most beautifully composed films I’ve seen. The framing, edits, and production design are just, simply, delightful. The camera floats along with the action. The colors are striking, and the intra-scene edits are almost non-existent (and when they are, they are seamless).

It is still flawed, as a story. Uneven and, shall we say, light on characters, not to mention just a tad long for its purpose. The lightness is was what it was meant to be, so I don’t judge it for that so much as still get frustrated when other films of the year (like Arrival) were pushed aside. But I ranted on that enough already. I will say that I still marvel at the choice and delivery of the final moments. It was brave and a much better resolution than the obvious.

La La will remain in my circle of rewatch for many years, I’m sure. Just as An American in Paris and Singin’ in the Rain, neither of which are perfect movies either.  And I will certainly be watching whatever Chezelle comes out with next.

Ikiru (To Live)

What is a life worth living? What is a life well-lived?  Akira Kurosawa tackles these questions through the life of a mid-level bureaucrat in 1950s Japan with his trademark patience and dark humor. From the start, Kuraosawa makes sure that while the subject may be deep, you aren’t taking it too seriously. His intent is to nudge rather than hit you upside the head.

Takashi Shimura drives this film in the main role. It is one of the most unpresupposing performances I’ve seen. We watch him literally open up and flower as the film goes on. There are few “big” moments, but several small, intense events that awaken in Shimura’s character a need to live. But is isn’t just the character journey that has impact. The overall structure of the narrative is just as intriguing as the story itself, unfolding in unexpected but necessary ways. If it weren’t for Kurosawa’s inventiveness, the 2.5 hours would have suffocated under its own weight. Instead, he manages to keep us intrigued through fearless storytelling, probably informed a little by his previous foray into narrative structure in Rashomon just two years previous.

Ikiru also marked Kurosawa’s moment before Seven Samurai and some of his most lasting cinema. Kurosawa, as a writer and director, has created and influenced some of the top films and directors of all time (including Star Wars via The Hidden Fortress). There is a beauty to his stories and craft, but never a moment when he insults his audience. His films are about his characters and their troubles and challenges… they just happen to also provide inspiration and commiseration for the viewer. Ikiru is a beautifully funny and heart-warming part of that opus that can still inspire 65 years after its release.

Ikiru

The Secret in Their Eyes (El secreto de sus ojos)

Sometimes you just miss a great movie when it comes out and have to play catch-up. In 2009, Juan José Campanella (Underdogs) broke out of his TV mold for a brief moment to deliver this quietly intense mystery/suspense romance that swept up awards worldwide. It is a highly complex story, playing with layers of fiction and reality across two time periods in a group of people’s lives. But it all comes together seamlessly and beautifully allowing each aspect of the story room to breath.

The tale is driven primarily by four players: Ricardo Darín (XXY), Soledad Villamil, Pablo Rago (Underdogs), and Guillermo Francella. One of the truely brilliant aspects of the film is watching the characters between the two time frames. They mature as well as visibly change in wonderfully subtle ways. The make-up is pretty amazing, but it is the actors and director that sell the shift. 

If you missed this, like I had, make time for it. It is really a solid film and story. If you are familiar with Argentine or Italian police procedurals, it will help (there are some significant differences with the US), but it isn’t required. This is primarily about the characters who are swept up in a decades-spanning case that haunts each of their lives in different ways.

The Secret in Their Eyes

I Am Not Your Negro

Probably the most brilliant aspect of Raoul Peck’s challenging documentary is that he doesn’t make you work to understand how it applies to today. Very often, the footage playing to Baldwin’s writing is from today. It is clear how far we’ve come and how far we haven’t. Another powerful choice was his selection of Samuel L. Jackson (Kong: Skull Island) as the voice of Baldwin. Though he pointedly tried not to imitate Baldwin, by his own interviews, it fits with all of the archival footage almost seamlessly.

James Baldwin was a scholar, an icon, and a man with the ability to bring an outsider’s view to the troubles and hypocrisies of American life and the history of the country. He was a quiet, but intense revolutionary bringing his intellect to bear in both printed and live forums. We could sorely use him today, but his lessons are all still applicable, if not any more as immediate.

Peck took Baldwin’s surviving notes for a planned book to create this film. It is full of archival footage and, as mentioned, brilliant voice over of Baldwin’s writings. As a window on the soul of this country, and any country where there was an institutionalized underclass, it is more than a little disturbing and unflinching. The power of the message and insight is uncomfortably bare and unavoidable.

As a film it is a bit less effective. Though there is the stated conceit of telling Baldwin’s life through his friendship with Medgar Evers, Malcom X, and Martin Luther King Jr., it isn’t really about that at all, though they all play roles in the narrative. We get little of Baldwin’s personal life… instead, the material lectures (brilliantly) on the world around him.  While impactful, it doesn’t feel personal.  It is more of a survey course of American history with the touch-points of the assassinations. Part of Peck’s challenge, no doubt, was the incomplete outline that had survived Baldwin he was working with, which was all framework and little flesh.

Regardless, this is a film worth seeing; particularly now. The reflection of today against the past is chilling, even if you have already recognized the similarities. We all want to believe that as we move forward as people and as a country we learn and improve. I Am Not Your Negro reminds us that mistakes, beliefs, fears, and self-delusions are not so easily shed and remain as ongoing subtext or repeat themselves until they are acknowledged in full and faced.

I Am Not Your Negro

Colossal

You owe yourself this film before the summer movie scene, full of visual gluttony and silly distraction, kicks off in a couple weeks. It isn’t that I won’t be lining up for some of those films too, but Colossal is a wonderful, small film with layers and humor and some effects to boot. Nacho Vigalondo, who also brought us the unexpected and wonderful Timecrimes, wrote and directed this darkish look at ourselves. He clearly has a sharp eye and a wicked keyboard as he pulls together his stories. (BTW, if you haven’t yet found Timecrimes yet, do. Great fun!)

Script and story aside, without Anne Hathaway (Alice Through the Looking Glass) this film would have been significantly less than it is. Hathaway navigates the narrow line she has to walk brilliantly. It could have easily devolved into slapstick or horror, but she found the border between Kaiju and intimate, personal tale and balanced on it to the end.

Opposite her, Jason Sudeikis (Angry Birds) does a nice job balancing out Hathaway’s character, having his own issues to contend with. Along with his retinue of Tim Blake Nelson (Fantastic Four) and Austin Stowell (Bridge of Spies), many mirrors are held up and struggles revealed. Rounding out the cast and necessary complications, Dan Stevens (Legion) also provides a sounding board for Hathaway.

This isn’t an Oscar worthy film or a Pulitzer prize winning script, but it is clever, complicated, and complete, each cog finally fitting together. More subtle, are the choices and decisions that bring about the finale. Though it is not nearly as Byzantine as Timecrimes, Vigalondo was very careful in the structure of this film. It’s very unexpected nature and solid delivery have me rating it a tad higher than it probably deserves, but I love being happily surprised.

Enough said. Just go out and see and support this one before all the sugar of the summer rots your brain.

Colossal

Dark Horse

Documentarian Louise Osmond (Deep Water) has a great eye for the human story behind the facts. Dark Horse is a great tale of “can do” spirit, both by the animal and the ad-hoc pub syndicate that decided to take a shot at the exclusive world of steeplechase racing.

This is a movie for anyone needing a sense of the possible, but also for anyone looking for perspective and balance when it comes to hard choices. While Osmond mentions the hard work and sacrifices of all involved, it really is focused less on the tasks and more on the emotional costs and choices to be made. It leads to some interesting editing choices. One, near the end, is quite jarring, but it makes sense as the film came into higher focus. It was a brave choice on Osmond’s part and it is the strongest example of her control and vision as a director.

I definitely recommend this documentary, despite any lack of high quality video or gaps in detail. The story it tells is compelling and touching; it is a sensibility that will enrich any viewer. And the story isn’t over yet.

Dark Horse

If I Were You

Romantic farce is difficult to pull off along with dark comedy. Very difficult. The story and the actors have to ride the line of credibility and the absurd and never fall off in one direction or the other. When it works it is, often, great. When it doesn’t, it is painful to watch. I’ve rated this a bit higher than I should mainly because writer/director Joan Carr-Wiggin pulled it off, even if it isn’t perfect.

However, while there are weaknesses in the movie, Marcia Gay Harden (Grandma) is not one of them. Harden’s often subtle performance is a near tour de force; it is certainly brilliant comedy and acting. She takes an impossible premise and makes you believe her choices and actions. Within the first 5 minutes you’ll realize just what a Herculean feat that is.

Which is also to say that the less you know of the story, the better. Don’t read the blurbs. If you like romance and comedy, just get your hands on a copy and enjoy. There is great fun in the surprises as the story spins out of bounds before pulling it all back together.

There is a competent cast supporting Harden, but they are mostly foils for her efforts. Even Leonor Watling (The Oxford Murders), who is her ostensible partner-in-crime, exists for Harden to work with and against. The one exception is Aidan Quinn (Elementary). His character is designed to be part of, but outside the chaos and Carr-Wiggin guided him well in that aspect.

Make time for this one when you’re in a silly or sappy mood (it really works either way). And watch it with someone; it deserves a shared response.

If I Were You

Codebreaker

When I first saw The Imitation Game, I felt it was missing something. It was well done and superbly acted, but there was so much more to the story than it covered… much I knew and some I didn’t. At the time, I had tripped across this 2011 documentary from the BBC but I only finally got my hands on it recently.

I admit that it is a bit staged in its re-enactments, but they are all based on recorded facts and add a level of humanism to what is a fascinating and tragic story. A story, I must say, feels even more relevant today than when it was released or even since Imitation Game hit screens a few short years ago.

This is as much a story of modern computing (with a bit of a snub to Babbage and Lovelace) as it is about prejudice, governments, and abuse of power. All very topical subjects these days.

Paul McGann (Luther) narrates well and unobtrusively. Turing, played by Ed Stoppard (Youth), equals Cumberbatch in skill, though with only short scenes to go by it isn’t a completely fair comparison. And Henry Goodman (Avengers: Age of Ultron) as his psychologist, friend, and confident is suitably open and sympathetic. These dramatized moments interposed with interviews and explanations very much help to ground the story and give is a face. In the end, it is a view of Turing that even Whitemore’s play, Breaking the Code, didn’t manage to fully capture because in both cases, movie and stage play, they decided to pick a focus rather than to absorb the whole.

If you have an interest in Turing or want to know more about the genesis of the modern computing age, this is an excellent way to learn more.

Codebreaker