The Cured

[3 stars]

What would happen if most (metaphorical) zombies could be cured? David Freyne tackles this question in his first feature. While admittedly re-treading some ground that In The Flesh took on wonderfully, The Cured has its own focus and apropos political points for our times. Its many secrets aren’t surprising, but neither does Freyne hold them back for very long.

Ellen Page (Umbrella Academy) manages to dominate the movie, despite being a supporting player. Her story is the most accessible and complex and, frankly, she has the best chops in the flick. The real focus of the tale is on Sam Keeley (Burnt), one of the cured who tries to reassimilate into a world that mostly doesn’t want that to happen. Keeley follows his path admirably, but the script and editing prevent him from ever really gaining steam. It’s Tom Vaughan-Lawlor, somewhat reprising his Ebony Maw (Avengers: Endgame) character, who tends to steal screen. Unfortunately, neither the writing nor directing help him feel completely real.

Zombies (and again, this isn’t a zombie movie other than as shorthand) have long been used as metaphors for differing fears and social concepts. From the fear of science and communism to the more recent terror of AIDS and ongoing homophobia. Most are movies about finding the cure or just simply surviving. Few stories tackle the guilt of those that survive and can remember.

Unfortunately, Freyne, while making some nods toward the central question of guilt and forgiveness, ended up getting lost in the slaughter and the intrigue. In effect, no one aspect of his story managed to come through as the main point, other than the stupidity of human-kind. You can see the potential in this movie bubbling under the surface, which is what keeps it interesting. Had it committed to the more unique paths of its tale, it could have really stood out in a crowded space.

However, even though the story fails to become something spectacular, it does provide a generally different take on the genre. It also does so with some solid talent and an impressive delivery for a low-budget indie. It isn’t a brilliant film, but it is a good one that shows off a new talent in Freyne. If he can continue to attract such good casts and believe more in his vision, his subsequent releases will be worth watching for.

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